When Breastfeeding is a Struggle

When Breastfeeding is a Struggle

Breastfeeding is natural, yes, but what happens if it doesn’t come naturally to you or your baby? You aren’t alone and there are solutions to the most common breastfeeding problems. Remember: Every mother and her baby have a unique breastfeeding relationship. Your journey doesn’t have to look or be like anyone else’s in order to be successful, rewarding, and healthy for both you and your baby. 
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Quote - Sunshine

Quote - Sunshine

Anyone who has had the opportunity to simply sit back and snuggle with a tiny new person knows that these are the moments when it feels like everything is right with the world.
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Six ways to prepare for baby (not just birth)

Six ways to prepare for baby (not just birth)

You’ve spent months learning and preparing for labor and the birth of your child, and then the moment comes: the birth is over and in your arms you have a tiny human who is beautiful, perfect… and entirely dependent on you. Preparing for your little one’s arrival goes well beyond
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What is a "Baby-Friendly®" Hospital?

What is a "Baby-Friendly®" Hospital?

Baby-Friendly®” is a phrase expectant parents may encounter when touring and choosing between prospective birth locations. The World Health Organization and UNICEF created the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, or BFHI, more than twenty years ago
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Welcoming Baby #2

Welcoming Baby #2

To the mom welcoming her second baby,

The warm weight of a newborn against your chest feels both familiar and somehow brand new as you settle into your role as a mom of two. The excitement and overwhelming love is just as

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Letter to new parents

Letter to new parents

Dear new parents,

Having a new baby is one of the biggest events in your life. There will be days when you feel like your heart will burst with the love you have for this new little person. There will be other days when you might question why you thought it was a good idea to become a parent in the first place. You will get bombarded with contradictory parenting advice and become overwhelmed. This is all normal. When you are in the throes of caring for a new baby, please remember these few things: 

There is no such thing as “perfect.” You can never be a perfect parent, nor will you be able to read a book or website and learn all that you need to know. Such a book or website does not and will never exist. You will make mistakes and learn as you go. You will make changes and adjust as you grow as a parent. You will do the best that you can. Give yourself permission to make mistakes.

Have patience. This stage, phase, or situation that you are in is just for a short time. Your baby will grow and change a little bit each day and you will too. Feedings in the wee hours of morning, colic, teething irritability, and tantrums are just phases that will pass. This doesn’t mean that you can’t do anything to help make these phases a little easier, but just remember that a little time helps too.

Trust your instincts. Don’t second guess your instincts when it comes to what is best for you and your baby. When you get conflicting advice, don’t assume someone else is right and you are wrong. No one else knows your baby and his/her needs like you do. Trust yourself and do what you think is best for yourself and your child.

Someday you will look back on this time with fond memories and a happy heart. You’ll wish you could do it all over again and you wouldn’t change a thing. Your child will tell you that you were the best mom in the world and you’ll agree.

With love,

Moms who’ve been there

Copyright 2014 © All Rights Reserved

Plumtree Baby, LLC

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Asking for help when baby arrives

Asking for help when baby arrives

When a friend or family member has a new baby, everyone is excited to express their congratulations, see the new baby, and give gifts. Often, friends and family want to help the new family in some way, but offers to feed and hold baby may not be the most helpful, especially for a breastfeeding mother/baby. Rather than politely declining help, parents can suggest these alternatives to their friends and family:

1. Can you bring food? Receiving a hot, homemade meal right at dinnertime can be a lifesaver for new parents and even more so if there are older siblings in the home. If you receive an offer of help, reply with a few available days that would be helpful to receive a meal. Be sure to discuss the time of day that would be best and note your food preferences and allergies (after all, people want you to enjoy what they bring). Friends and family can easily double a recipe and serve their own family and yours at the same time, and it makes them feel good to help. If you want to organize a number of meals and get others on board, check out www.mealtrain.com, a free and very convenient way to stay organized and avoid having the same dish three days in a row, or three meals delivered at once.

2. I would love a visit, but I can’t be a host. Especially if you have visitors in the first week or two, you will be tired, sore and trying to figure things out with baby care and breastfeeding. Be clear that you only have time for a brief visit, or for close friends and family, ask if they could help you while they visit. Maybe they could look after baby while you go take a long, uninterrupted shower or take a nap. If you are breastfeeding, they could make you a snack or bring you a drink, rather than the other way around. If you have older children, perhaps your visitors could take them to the park for a few minutes or entertain them while you care for baby. 

3. Would you mind helping me when you visit? A few minutes spent running the vacuum, folding a load of laundry or walking the dog can help so much. Or before your visitors come over, ask if they can stop at the store and pick up a few things that you need. Saving you a trip to the store for a few things can alleviate a lot of stress.

4. Can you check in with me every day? Some days can be rough and emotional, and just a text or phone call to check in can help you remember that you're not alone and people care. On the easier days, you can catch up and stay connected with those closest to you. 

5. I have a gift registry for a service that will be very helpful. Rather than receiving an overload of blankets or outfits at your shower, guests can choose to donate to a gift certificate for housekeeping services, diaper services or the services of a postpartum doula. Convey that these gifts will be something you will need and appreciate.

Friends and family genuinely want to do whatever they can to lend you support, but giving them specific ideas can help ensure they do so in a way that will best serve your needs and may alleviate tension for everyone. For more ideas to eliminate stress after baby arrives, see our Following the Birth booklet. 

Copyright 2014 © All Rights Reserved

Plumtree Baby, LLC

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You've had a baby. Now what? Five ways to ease postpartum stress

You've had a baby. Now what? Five ways to ease postpartum stress

Many new parents put a lot of focus, time and energy into learning about pregnancy and preparing for birth, but when the baby finally arrives, find themselves feeling lonely, bewildered and unprepared. We explore five simple steps parents can take ahead of time to prepare and make their lives easier following the birth of their child.
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Thoughtful Decisions - Delayed Cord Clamping

Thoughtful Decisions - Delayed Cord Clamping

It goes without saying that we here at Plumtree Baby are committed to the idea of making thoughtful decisions throughout pregnancy and labor. We also believe that this process of making decisions extends into the newborn period and one of the first decisions expectant parents will be confronted with is when to clamp the umbilical cord of their newborn. Many expectant parents don't even realize that the actions taken with the cord can be greatly influenced and/or dictated by parental preferences.
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